DISC 2018: Developments in Structural Concrete: Better - Smarter - Stronger

Presentation synopses

 
Ioanna-Papanikolaou.jpeg Graphene-reinforced materials for self-sensing applications
Ioanna Papanikolaou MEng MRes GMICE, Costain / University of Cambridge

This research investigates the potential use of nanotechnology and in particular graphene materials for self-sensing applications. Graphene is reported to enhance the mechanical and durability properties and instigate a self-sensing mechanism of the cement matrix. The presenter will also cover current developments in the self-healing concrete area and the Resilient Materials for Life (RM4L) programme.

Ioanna holds a MEng degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Surrey and a MRes degree in Future Infrastructure and the Built Environment from the University of Cambridge. She has worked as a civil engineer in the UK with Costain Group at the £1 bn London Power Tunnels project and more recently as Innovations Manager and Smart Infrastructure Advisor on the £4 bn Thames Tideway Tunnel, the largest tunnelling project currently taking place in the UK. Costain has funded Ioanna to pursue a PhD in advanced materials and nanotechnology for tunnelling applications at the University of Cambridge, where she is supervised by Professor Abir Al-Tabbaa and she is part of the Geotechnics research group in the civil engineering department. Ioanna recently won the Best Paper Award and the BASF Award at the 12th fib international PhD Symposium for her research.
 
   
Andri-Setiawan.jpg Punching shear of slab-column connections under seismic loading
Andri Setiawan BSc, MSc, Imperial College London

Despite poor performance of slab-column connections under seismic loading, flat slabs without shear reinforcement have been widely used in regions with high seismicity including southern Europe and West Coast of the United States. The condition is worsened by the fact that current seismic provisions for punching are still largely empirical and based on laboratory tests of thin slabs not representative of practice. The study presented here utilises nonlinear finite element analysis (NLFEA) to investigate various parameters which influence the seismic behaviour of slab-column connections. In addition, an analytical procedure based on the Critical Shear Crack Theory is proposed. The procedure is shown to be not only more accurate than empirically-based models but also sufficiently practical for design purposes.

Andri Setiawan is a 3rd year PhD student in the Structures Section of the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London. He is currently working on punching shear in flat slab buildings situated in seismic regions under the supervision of Dr. Robert Vollum and Dr. Lorenzo Macorini. Before starting his PhD, Andri was involved in some interesting construction projects in his home country, Indonesia. These included implementation of a base isolation technique in a commercial building, optimisation of skyscraper design using seismic performance-based methodology, and the design of a fully precast RC container terminal in an earthquake-prone area. Andri holds both bachelor and master degree with distinction from Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia.
   
John-Bennetts.jpg Uncertainties in bridge inspection data and the need for change
John Bennetts MA, MSc, GMICE, WSP
The condition information we collect on our bridge structures is increasingly used to inform decision making. However, this data is known to be variable as it relies on the subjective assessment of inspectors during visual inspections. This large study on behalf of Highways England independently inspected 200 bridges on the UK strategic road network to understand the nature of the variation in inspection data between inspectors, and the implications for the ways in which we use these data.

John is a Senior Bridge Engineer at WSP, he graduated from Cambridge in 2010 and has since undertaken a diverse range of projects including research, bridge design and assessment using a wide variety of analysis techniques and materials. He has played an important role in providing specialist advice to Highways England related to the performance of their bridge stock and the prioritisation of through life maintenance and inspection, applying cutting-edge data science and machine learning techniques to deliver new insights.
   
Pieter-Desnerck.jpg Reinforced concrete half-joint bridges: dealing with deterioration and shortcomings
Pieter Desnerck PhD, Brunel University London

A half joint is a particular type of RC structure. Within the existing UK Highways England network alone there are 400+ concrete bridges with half joints. The advantages of this structural form include a level running surface along the bridge deck and the support spans, and precast beams can be easily lifted into place and supported during construction. However, a disadvantage inherent in this type of construction is that there are problems associated with leakage through the joint, increasing the propensity for the deterioration of the concrete and reinforcement steel. Half joint details have come under intense scrutiny since the collapse of a section of the de la Concorde Overpass in Quebec, Canada in 2006. Thus, a key challenge is to understand the lessons to be learned from the Concorde Overpass Collapse, and the inherent vulnerabilities in half joint structures.This presentation will discuss the findings of an experimental study into more accurate assessments of half-joint structures, and will discuss the management strategy for half-joint structures throughout the UK.

Dr Pieter Desnerck is a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in Civil Engineering in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Brunel University London. He obtained his PhD studying the mechanical behaviour of self-compacting concrete from Ghent University (Belgium) in 2011. He has worked as a post-doctoral researcher at the Universite de Sherbrooke (Canada), Missouri University of Science and Technology (USA) and as a senior research associate / affiliated lecturer at the University of Cambridge (UK). His principal research interests lie in the area of structural behaviour of building materials with an emphasis on flowable concretes  and assessment and the deterioration of reinforced concrete structures.
   
Joost-Walraven.jpg fib Bulletin 81 on Punching Shear
Joost Walraven Prof.dr.ir.Dr. h.c., TU Delft

The punching shear capacity of slabs in buildings is a crucial aspect of structural safety and integrity, the importance of which was testified by several failures. Although modelling of punching shear behaviour developed from an empirical to a rational and realistic level, there are still questions left with regard to several aspects of the punching shear capacity. An example is the origin of the size effect in slabs with increasing thickness. Another point of interest is the residual punching shear capacity of existing structures. Finally robustness, optimum detailing and behaviour under dynamic loads are of interest. The bulletin reports on a workshop organized in cooperation between fib and ACI, where mutual experience was exchanged.

Joost Walraven got his MSc and PhD-degree from Delft University of Technology. From 1972 – 1981 he was researcher at the same university. From 1981 – 1985 he worked as a consulting engineer for Corsmit Consulting Engineers in The Hague, The Netherlands. In the period 1985-1989 he was professor of concrete structures at the University of Darmstadt in Germany. 1989-2012 he was professor of concrete and concrete structures at TU Delft. 2012-now he is emeritus professor at TUD and consulting engineer. He was convenor of the project team for Eurocode 2: Concrete Structures 1998-2002. He was chairman of the fib committee “New fib Model Code for Concrete Structures”, which appeared in 2010. He was president of fib 2000-2002.
   
Phil-Bamforth.jpg Revisions to CIRIA C660 and the implications for the design for early-age thermal crack control
Phil Bamforth B Sc, Ph. D, C. Eng, MICE

CIRIA C660, published in 2007, has been revised and published as CIRIA C766 in response to feedback from users.  The main issues addressed include - the allowable crack width and the effect of cover; the minimum area of reinforcement, including the use of a sustained load factor; creep over the long term: additional guidance on calculating end restraint; and adjustment to the predicted heat generation for concrete containing ground granulated blast-furnace slag (ggbs). The paper discusses with the significance of each of these changes for design of reinforcement, which is generally less than currently required.

Dr Phil Bamforth is a chartered Civil Engineer with over 45 years’ experience.  He has been an independent consultant since 2003, specialising in Concrete Construction, Durability and Service Life Design and has worked with clients in the UK, continental Europe, the Middle East, the Far East and Australia. He is the author of CIRIA C660, Early Age Thermal Crack Control in Concrete.
   
Aurelio-Muttoni.jpg
Concrete shells – towards efficient structures: construction of an ellipsoidal concrete shell in Switzerland
Aurelio Muttoni Prof. Dr. sc. techn. ETH, Muttoni and Fernández Consulting Engineers, Ecublens, Switzerland
 
The presentation will describe the design and construction of a shell in the form of an ellipsoid (93 × 52 × 22 m) with thickness varying between 100 and 120 mm, awarded with the fib Award for Outstanding Concrete Structures in 2014. The shell was built using sprayed concrete combined with ordinary concrete in some regions. A number of tailored solutions were also adopted such as post-tensioning, addition of fibres and shear studs, to ensure satisfactory performance both at the serviceability and ultimate limit states.

Aurelio Muttoni is Full Professor and Head of the Structural Concrete Laboratory at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland). He is also partner of Muttoni and Fernández Consulting Engineers. Between 2015 and 2018, he was the leader of Project Team PT1 in charge of the revision of EN 1992.
   
New Tottenham Hotspur Stadium: A showcase for the range and versatility of concrete solutions for sports stadia
Spencer Robinson Meng, MICE, MIStructE, MIEAust, Buro Happold

The presentation explores the effective application of a range of concrete solutions to create fantastic outcomes for the new Tottenham Hotspur football stadium.  The design for new Tottenham Hotspur stadium comprised complex geometry and large column grids to great open flexible spaces, which together with a challenging programme and phased construction created large demands on the structural design.  The range of concrete solutions included cantilevered precast rakers and terracing, post-tensioned concrete floors and transfer structures, and seamless interfaces with large scale steel structures.  
With a consistent materiality in a range of applications the concrete solutions collectively combine to create a high quality, visually stunning product that is sure to  delight the fans.

Spencer is an Associate Director with BuroHappold with extensive experience in multi-disciplinary design on complex projects that range from small scale residential to large scale Sports and Entertainment projects.  In recent years Spencer has worked on the transformation of the 2012 London Olympic stadium for West Ham and led the delivery of the structural design for the new Tottenham Hotspur football stadium. Spencer currently leads the BuroHappold engineering teams supporting Marylebone Cricket Club with the design for the new Compton and Edrich stands at Lord's cricket ground.   
   
Jon-Shave.jpg An introduction to prospective updates to EN1992
Jon Shave MEng MA PhD CEng MICE, WSP

The presentation will provide an introduction to the topics to be updated in the second generation of EN1992 (excluding shear design, which is covered separately). Jon will draw on his experience as one of the 7 members of the international project team that has been developing the draft update to EN1992 in the first phase of the project from 2015 to 2018. The proposed updates to the standard will include improvements in ease of use and incorporate additional and improved technical content to increase the scope of the document and allow future designers of concrete structures to benefit from up to date research and technology.

Jon is WSP’s Specialist Consultancy Services Lead for Civil, Bridge and Ground Engineering, which includes the delivery of specialist advice to civil engineering clients, including the development of design standards and the application of research and innovation. He is a member of three of the international project teams developing the second generation of Eurocodes, including EN1992. He is also heavily involved the current project to update the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges for Highways England. Jon is an experienced bridge designer and has a PhD in the assessment of shear in concrete bridges.
   
Aurelio-Muttoni.jpg Updated shear provisions for the next generation of EN 1992
Aurelio Muttoni Prof. Dr. sc. techn. ETH, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland

The update of shear provisions for the next generation of EN 1992 is aimed at enhancing ease of use for common tasks of design. In addition, it also has the ambition to provide structural engineers with a tool to perform more complex tasks, as the assessment of critical concrete structures. To achieve these purposes, the provisions are based on a mechanical model which allows accounting in a consistent manner for the size effect and for the influence of different concrete types.

Aurelio Muttoni is Full Professor and Head of the Structural Concrete Laboratory at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (Switzerland). He is also partner of Muttoni and Fernández Consulting Engineers. Between 2015 and 2018, he was the leader of Project Team PT1 in charge of the revision of EN 1992.
   
Steve-Denton.jpg Process for the evolution of the Eurocodes
Steve Denton FREng, FICE, FIStructE, WSP

A brief summary will be provided of the next steps in the evolution of the structural Eurocodes, indicating the expected programme and opportunities for input.

Dr Steve Denton is WSP’s Head of Civil, Bridge and Ground Engineering leading a group of over 650 staff.  He also heads WSP’s Technical Leadership Group.  In addition to his business leadership responsibilities, Steve retains a high degree of involvement in technically demanding and complex projects.  He is the Chair of CEN/TC 250, the international committee with overall responsibility for the Structural Eurocodes and is currently leading a major European effort to develop the second generation of these key design standards.  Steve is also a fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, a Visiting Professor at the University of Bath and a trustee for Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol.   
   
Cam-Middleton.jpg In quest of the holy grails of construction
Cam Middleton BE(Hons), MSc, DIC, PhD, CEng, FICE, FIE(Aust), Laing O’Rourke Professor of Construction Engineering & Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge

This aim of this presentation is to hold a high level dialogue with the conference participants in which I wish to explore ideas for what might be the  construction industries equivalent of the “moonshot” or “a cure for cancer”. I plan to suggest that a focus on a few big breakthroughs might help drive forward innovation in the industry.

Campbell Middleton is the Director of the Laing O’Rourke Centre for Construction Engineering & Technology in the Department of Engineering at Cambridge University. Prior to Cambridge, he worked for 8 years in professional practice in infrastructure design and construction in Australia and with Arup in London. He is Chairman of the UK Bridge Owners Forum, a member of the Design Panel for High Speed 2, and has acted as an advisor or consultant to a number of organisations including Infrastructure UK, the Highways Agency (now Highways England), Ministry of Transportation, Ontario and the National Transport Commission in Australia. He has received a number of academic awards including the Henry Adams Award of the Institution of Structural Engineers in 1999 & 2014, and the Telford Premium Award (1999) and Telford Gold Medal (2010) from the Institution of Civil Engineers. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Civil Engineers, the Institution of Engineers, Australia and the Transport Research Foundation. His research interests include advanced plastic analysis, risk & asset management, non-destructive testing, off-site manufacturing, modular and additive manufacturing, applications of computer vision & smart sensor applications for structural health monitoring. He is a member of the executive team responsible for overseeing the EPSRC/Innovate UK funded Centre for Smart Infrastructure and Construction and co-author of a recent book titled Bridge Monitoring – A Practical Guide.
Joost-Walraven-(1).jpg High performance fibre concrete: on the way to full acceptance​
Joost Walraven Prof.dr.ir.Dr. h.c., TU Delft

The introduction of ultra-high performance fibre reinforced concrete was revolutionary, because suddenly a concrete became available with a strength of twice that of the high performance concretes developed in the nineties. Meanwhile fascinating applications have been realized. However, a large area of potential application is as well offered by fibre concrete’s with intermediate strengths.  A problem until recently was that design recommendations for fibre reinforced concrete, valid for  the complete range of low to ultra-high strength concretes, was missing. In the fib Model Code 2010 such a recommendation has been introduced. This concept is now under further development.

Joost Walraven got his MSc and PhD-degree from Delft University of Technology. From 1972 – 1981 he was researcher at the same university. From 1981 – 1985 he worked as a consulting engineer for Corsmit Consulting Engineers in The Hague, The Netherlands. In the period 1985-1989 he was professor of concrete structures at the University of Darmstadt in Germany. 1989-2012 he was professor of concrete and concrete structures at TU Delft. 2012-now he is emeritus professor at TUD and consulting engineer. He was convenor of the project team for Eurocode 2: Concrete Structures 1998-2002. He was chairman of the fib committee “New fib Model Code for Concrete Structures”, which appeared in 2010. He was president of fib 2000-2002.
   








 
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