Conservation of heritage structures
Date & Time

1 December 2020 - 3 December 2020
17:00-19:30 GMT

Price
CARE members - £45 + VAT
Members - £145 + VAT
ICE members - £145 + VAT
Standard rate - £245 + VAT
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Conservation of heritage structures

Conference
Date & Time

1 December 2020 - 3 December 2020
17:00-19:30 GMT

Price
CARE members - £45 + VAT
Members - £145 + VAT
ICE members - £145 + VAT
Standard rate - £245 + VAT

Availability Available

This online conference is spread across three consecutive evenings. It covers different aspects of conservation that are relevant to professionals working in the built environment.

The conference is organised by members of the Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers (CARE). CARE is jointly administered by the Institution of Civil Engineers and IStructE.

Four guest speakers and two CARE registrants will cover popular aspects of conservation. They will share their knowledge of techniques used on heritage projects.

Over the three evenings, delegates can share their knowledge and discuss various aspects of related planning regulation.


Evening one


Construction history and conservation


Bill Addis will consider the relevance of construction history to extending the life of existing structures. He will:
  • Illustrate this theme with the early history of reinforced concrete shells
  • Observe how construction history and conservation engineering interact in several countries
  • Suggest how conservation engineering in the UK might develop

Evening two


SS Great Britain and Fort Brockhurst Bridge: one material, two approaches


Robert Turner will offer a comparison of the treatment of the ironwork for a bridge and a ship. The treatment of the bridge needed to allow it to function at maximum capacity. The ship was to become the focal point of a museum.


Cleaning, repair and refinishing of historic metalwork


Russel Turner will talk about various cleaning techniques and associated considerations. He will discuss minimal intervention repair options for ferrous and non-ferrous metals. He will also cover refinishing options.


Evening three


How lime mortar works


David Wiggins will examine the functional behaviour of traditional lime mortar. He will look at its structural role within masonry through to its role as a weatherproofing medium. The phenomenon of sacrificial weathering will be explained. The presentation will dispel some myths about lime mortar. It will conclude with practical specification from an engineer’s perspective.
 

Intended for

Any structural or civil engineer with an active role in conservation projects. Architects, historians, and those with a keen interest in heritage and conservation are also encouraged to attend.
 

Speakers

Bill Addis

Bill is author of over 100 publications on the history of building engineering, construction materials and building design. He developed CIRCE, an information resource for conservation engineers and was co-editor of Construction History 2011-16. Since retirement he has been a visiting professor at six universities in continental Europe.

Robert Turner

Robert is a member of ICon (The Institute of Conservation), and a member of the International Committee for the Conservation of Industrial Heritage. He has project managed conservation projects such as the Albert Memorial, the SS Great Britain and the MoD’s Future Support for HMS Victory.

Russel Turner

Russel is an accredited conservator specialising in metals used in the historic built environment ranging from small museum objects to bridges, piers and ships. Project work has included conservation of the Ironbridge in Shropshire; Clarence Bridge, Regents Park; Gravesend Town Pier; Linlathen Bridge; and the roof of the Argyll Mausoleum.

David Wiggins

David has a doctorate in the functional behaviour and technical conservation of heritage masonry. He is a CARE-accredited structural engineer. David recently won the Institution of Civil Engineer’s Baker Medal for his paper describing the rehabilitation of a three-span masonry arch highway bridge at Brougham Castle, Cumbria.

Contact

Email - [email protected]

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