The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 11 (1933) > Issues > Issue 2 > The Lay-Out and Construction of Sports Grounds and Grand Stands
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The Lay-Out and Construction of Sports Grounds and Grand Stands

DURING the last few years the term "Stadia" has frequently been used in describing sports enclosures. It is derived from the old Greek word " Stadium," which originally applied to the foot race course at Olympia. This structure was erected in the 3rd century, B.C., and was 630 feet in length, with two parallel tiers of stone seats along each side, joined at one end by a semicircular curve. It is interesting to note that the distance between the two end pylons measured 606.75 feet, and that this was afterwards adopted by the Romans as a measure of distance, eight "Stadia" being equal to one Roman Mile. James Reed

Author(s): Reed, James

Keywords: stadia;design;terraces;murrayfield, edinburgh