The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 11 (1933) > Issues > Issue 4 > Reinforced Concrete Viaducts at Valentine's Glen, Northern Ireland
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Reinforced Concrete Viaducts at Valentine's Glen, Northern Ireland

THIS scheme has been carried out by the L.M.S. Northern Counties Committee, in conjunction with the Government of Northern Ireland, to expedite the service to Derry and Portrush and relieve unemployment. It involves a new line about 28 miles long, which crosses several public roads and numerous streams. All bridges, both over and under, are carried out in reinforced concrete. At one point the existing railway crosses a deep glen by means of a 2-span masonry arch, but the new loop line crosses a tan angle about 200 ft.farther up stream, involving a viaduct structure about 630 ft. long. Immediately at the Belfast end of this structure the down line to Larne will pass underneath the new viaduct, and cross the glen on a line approximately parallel to the existing 2-span arch. This necessitated a second viaduct about 400 ft. long, which is known as the Down Shore Viaduct. (The up shore line is carried on the existing 2-span masonry arch.)

Keywords: railway bridges;ireland;reinforced concrete;skew bridges;curved bridges