The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 22 (1944) > Issues > Issue 8 > Stabilisation of Soils. The Importance of this Factor in the Structural Design of a Road
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Stabilisation of Soils. The Importance of this Factor in the Structural Design of a Road

ALTHOUGH soil mechanics is not a new science, it is in comparatively recent years only that highway engineers have appreciated the vital effect of the underlying soil on the superimposed structure. This effect was first brought impressively to the notice of the writer during the last war. After returning from active service, the writer was put in charge of the constructional works of what was probably the largest military camp in the British Isles. After a severe frost of considerable duration in the winter of 1917, enormous damage was caused by frost heave to the existing roads and to road-beds excavated to receive metalling. The ground, clay and chalk, literally boiled when the thaw came with great suddenness. Nevertheless, in view of the extreme urgency of the work, construction had to go on, and it became a crucial matter of overcoming natural conditions with a minimum of time and available materials. H.E. Brooke-Bradley