The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 3 (1925) > Issues > Issue 2 > An Investigation into the Size and Confirmation of Sands, With a View to Their Suitability for Concr
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An Investigation into the Size and Confirmation of Sands, With a View to Their Suitability for Concrete

THE Method of specifying the proportions of Concrete material by so many loose volumes of gravel to a definite number of volumes of cement has much to commend it, for it is easy of application. To those using concrete, however, it has been apparent for a long time that to get the best results, those proportions must be determined by having regard to the nature of the aggregate. Many examples can be recalled in which a "lean" concrete has developed much greater strength than a much "fatter" one. A recent method of investigating the matter, especially by American Engineers, is to determine how much mortar, composed of three sand to one cement, will fill the voids in the aggregate of broken stone or gravel and to specify the quantities accordingly. These methods are more or less empirical and this investigation has been undertaken to ascertain, if possible, some definite standard of aggregate material; a more or less ideal substance, towards which one might approximate. Harry Jackson

Author(s): Jackson, Harry

Keywords: sand;mix design;concrete;experiments;size