The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 35 (1957) > Issues > Issue 10 > Structural Problems Connected with Palletisation Discussion on the Paper by Mr. Brian Scruby
Name of File 2372-35-10.pdf cached at 17/12/2017 00:30:04 - with 4 pages. pdfPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\61\614dce83-ed34-4f63-bc8f-272d6c25b1df.pdf. thumbPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\pdfthumbs\614dce83-ed34-4f63-bc8f-272d6c25b1df_1.png. objDoc: 1 - True. objPreview.Log: . strFileName: 614dce83-ed34-4f63-bc8f-272d6c25b1df_1.png

Members/subscribers must be logged in to view this article

Structural Problems Connected with Palletisation Discussion on the Paper by Mr. Brian Scruby

THE CHAIRMAN, who opened the discussion, said that he had never before fully appreciated the modern development in the handling and stacking of materials. It was a rather frightening thought that, when going to the grocer and buying some sugar or l lb. packet of margarine, one was setting in train a vast mass of movement in palletisation, ending up in an enormous store of the commodity. Long before the war, the grocers seemed to manage without all these elaborate depots; but people were now probably becoming the slaves of mass production, mass storage, mass advertising and mass buying. In fact, judging from the film which had been shown, in about fifty years’ time the housewife would drive down to the grocer’s shop with a little fork lift truck instead of a shopping basket. That was the way things appeared to be going.