The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 39 (1961) > Issues > Issue 8 > Aluminium Strut Design Discussion on the Paper by J. B. Dwight, M.A., M.Sc., A.M.I.Mech.E.
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Aluminium Strut Design Discussion on the Paper by J. B. Dwight, M.A., M.Sc., A.M.I.Mech.E.

Mr. DWIGHT said that in the paper he had attempted to reduce the complication and to make life easier for the designer. Aluminium had two serious disadvantages which were rather like two millstones around the neck of the designer in aluminium-first the high cost of the material and secondly the low E. Aluminium cost about two and a half times as much as steel and it was three times as flexible. But there were two important advantages - first that it did not rust, and secondly we had the marvellously versatile extrusion process at our disposal. Because it did not rust, we had not to worry about using thin section; we might use 1/8 in. section, whereas in the case of steel the 1/8 in. might represent the rust allowance.