The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 44 (1966) > Issues > Issue 10 > The Design and Construction of Cylindrical Television Masts in Great Britain. Discussion on the pape
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The Design and Construction of Cylindrical Television Masts in Great Britain. Discussion on the paper by T. F. Mears CEng AMlStructE and W. R. Charman CEng AMlStructE

Introducing the paper, Mr. Mears said that when, in 1962, the Independent Television Authority announced their plans to build three new high transmitting masts it was apparent from the specification that there was a need to depart from the conventional open-latticed structure. The problem of servicing the extensive aerial systems suggested that serious consideration should be given to an all-weather structure and attention was therefore directed towards the design of a cylindrical plate mast. The television aerials, by reason of their sensitive performance, could be mounted only on relatively slender latticed columns above the main support cylinder. Fibreglass shrouds completely encircling these sections of mast would afford the necessary weather protection. A further feature was the provision of an electrically powered passenger lift operating from ground level up to the lowest aerial aperture.