The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 47 (1969) > Issues > Issue 9 > The Implications of the Report of the Inquiry into the Collapse of Flats at Ronan Point, Canning Tow
Name of File 3159-47-09.pdf cached at 13/12/2017 09:00:20 - with 3 pages. pdfPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\09\091ab8c9-0799-425e-a4f2-d68f2628fcd1.pdf. thumbPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\pdfthumbs\091ab8c9-0799-425e-a4f2-d68f2628fcd1_1.png. objDoc: 1 - True. objPreview.Log: . strFileName: 091ab8c9-0799-425e-a4f2-d68f2628fcd1_1.png

Members/subscribers must be logged in to view this article

The Implications of the Report of the Inquiry into the Collapse of Flats at Ronan Point, Canning Town. Report of the Open Discussion Meeting held on 27 February 1969, together with written Discussion, was published in The Sructural Engineer in July

Mr. F. C. Greenfield : ‘The design-or examination of another’s design - of a modern structure calls for “professional excellence” comparable with any other of man’s skills; it is high time the layman was aware of this. Legislation is badly needed to ensure that the public are protected through structural design, examination of structural design (on behalf of the local authority) and also supervision on site-all under the direction of Chartered Engineers recognised in their profession for their skill in this field. Local authorities should ascertain that they have the necessary professional excellence in their staff; if they do not they should either attract the right men or engage Consulting Engineers-or do both. For those who rely entirely on their own staff, full responsibility must be shouldered by the engineer-Chief Officer.'