The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 5 (1913-15) > Issues > Issue 3 > Factory construction in reinforced concrete
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Factory construction in reinforced concrete

IT is now generally recognized that a well-equipped series of shops is an absolutely essential factor in a successful industrial concern. It is as important as the machinery and plant and the site. It is not difficult to prove that these will be crippled by being housed in unsuitable buildings where the first must be limited in efficiency, underdriven, and wastefully or harmfully worked, and the second so badly utilized as to counteract its peculiar merits. To be completely efficient, it is necessary to be as thoroughly up to date in the buildings as in the plant, for to be up to date means to have taken advantage of every development and improvement in machinery and organization, and, other things being equal, indirectly it is the most important factor in success. Percival M. Fraser