The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 6 (1928) > Issues > Issue 8 > The City of Sheffield War Memorial
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The City of Sheffield War Memorial

The following description of a combined concrete and steelwork structure of somewhat unusual character may not be without interest.The structure in question is the Sheffield City War Memorial. The War Memorial Committee, in 1924, invited competitive designs, and in response, about forty designs were sent in and the one about to be described was ultimately chosen. One condition was that the cost should be limited to about 65,000. All the designs offered with the exception of the one selected, were monuments in masonry or masonry and concrete combined. The choice of the premiated design was possibly influenced by itsomewhat novel character, although from the point of view of longevity, it mustcompare unfavourably with a memorial built entirely of stone. The memorial, Fig. I, consists of a Venetian mast about 100 ft. in height springing from an octagonal bronze base which stands on a sandstone ashlar curb. The mast is constructed of mild steel plates riveted together so as to present a smooth surface to the outside. It is surmounted by a suitable finial and carries a bronze pulley at the summit for hoisting flags, painting or repairing cradles, &c. The bronze monument constituting the base stands about 20 ft. high, and bears the arms of the various branches of the services and is surmounted by four figures in mourning attitude. The work involved in the construction may be divided conveniently into four sections-the artistic portion comprising the bronze castings, the mast profile and the cut stonework-the steel mast-the reinforced concrete foundation, and finally the erection. A short account of the structural features will probably be of the greater interest to members. Prof. Husband

Author(s): Husband, J