The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 60 (1982) > Issues > Issue 5 > Discussion on The Behaviour of Brick Walls Under Conditions of Settlement by I.A. MacLeod and S. A.
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Discussion on The Behaviour of Brick Walls Under Conditions of Settlement by I.A. MacLeod and S. A. Abu-El-Magd

Mr S. Thorburn (F) (Thorburn & Partners): When I initially perused the analytical paper' by Professor MacLeod, 1 thought that he was trying to convert an art into a science, but that would be a rather unfair impression to give. When a problem defies analytical prediction we excuse ourselves by treating it as an art. The word 'art' needs to be defined. Art really means judgment, and judgment demands a real understanding of structures. That is the basis of sound judgment. The more case histories we have-good case histories-with adequate definitions of the ground and structure, the better our judgment. I do not think you can predict adequately the differential settlement of a structure, whereas you can, within reasonable limits, predict the total movement-as has been demonstrated by many of the buildings that we have investigated.