The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 61 (1983) > Issues > Issue 10 > The Work of the Standing Committee on Structural Safety
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The Work of the Standing Committee on Structural Safety

Origins In the earlier days of civilisation, the safety of a structure depended entirely on the designer’s and builder’s intuition and experience. Many fine structures were built, some of which stand today; but there were many failures and these served to develop the designer’s understanding of structural behaviour. The Rt. Hon. the Lord Penney