The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 61 (1983) > Issues > Issue 7 > Discussion on The Design and Construction of the River Stour Bridge, Wimborne Bypass
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Discussion on The Design and Construction of the River Stour Bridge, Wimborne Bypass

Mr A. C. G. Hayward (F) (Cass Hayward & Partners): The author is to be congratulated on his elegant bridge, which displays the attributes of steel in giving a slender structure, easy to construct. He states that a concrete design would not have been cheaper, and this reflects a current trend even for quite modest spans, in this case 34 m. As evidenced by recent winning contractor’s alternative designs, steel is again finding favour. This is often where official designs had been done in concrete quite correctly at a time when the relative economies had dictated against steel. This problem, of course, is often inevitable in larger projects where tenders are invited some years after the appraisal is first done and choice of design made. It can be alleviated if contract documents allow freedom for submission of viable alternative designs by contractors to defined rules of selection. An independent, design check is a vital part of such procedures.