The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 65 (1987) > Issues > Issue 7 > Stabilising Monumental Bronze: the Statue of Lord Carson of Duncairn, Parliament Buildings, Stormont
Name of File 5014-65-07.pdf cached at 14/12/2017 08:31:10 - with 4 pages. pdfPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\7b\7b1032a2-f930-479a-9305-2c934e31118e.pdf. thumbPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\pdfthumbs\7b1032a2-f930-479a-9305-2c934e31118e_1.png. objDoc: 1 - True. objPreview.Log: . strFileName: 7b1032a2-f930-479a-9305-2c934e31118e_1.png

Members/subscribers must be logged in to view this article

Stabilising Monumental Bronze: the Statue of Lord Carson of Duncairn, Parliament Buildings, Stormont, Belfast

After 50 years’ exposure to the atmosphere, much of the protective original patina on the figure of Lord Carson and on four panels set into a supporting granite column had fallen victim to bronze corrosion. Radiographic and microscopic tests were conducted to ascertain the physical structure of the statue and the condition of the metal. Superficial salts were gently cleaned off with very low pressure compressed-air containing fine glass ‘bead’ particles, a technique known as ‘microblasting’. After treatment with corrosion inhibitor, the metal was spray-coated with a durable clear lacquer developed especially for outdoor bronze to stabilise and protect it against moisture and dirt. To prolong its own effective life the lacquer received a mineral wax coating. Metallic salts from the corroding figure had not discoloured the non- porous granite comprising the remainder of the monument, and therefore stonework was not brought into the present conservation programme. M.F. Fry Research-based studies on the subject of protecting