The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 66 (1988) > Issues > Issue 1 > Discussion on Towards Better Structures for Tomorrow by Mr. D.K. Doran, Mr. S.B. Tietz, Mr. D,W, Qui
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Discussion on Towards Better Structures for Tomorrow by Mr. D.K. Doran, Mr. S.B. Tietz, Mr. D,W, Quinion and Mr. G.H. Hutton

Mr Wex: I thought there was a degree of contradiction between David Quinion and Geoffrey Hutton. I inferred David Quinion was implying that, with quality assurance applied to innovation, there really was very little that the innovator could not prove before the structure was constructed. I think that Geoffrey Hutton is saying-and I rather agree with him-that if we do a reasonable amount of laboratory testing (or, perhaps, however much we do), it is not until the structure has been up for 10, 20, 30, or 40 years that we really find out what is happening to that innovation because of the difficulty of reproducing in laboratory short-term experiments long term environmental conditions. I am misunderstanding you both?