The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 67 (1989) > Issues > Issue 14 > Correspondence on Designing for Safety by P.H. Allen and E.G. Lovejoy
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Correspondence on Designing for Safety by P.H. Allen and E.G. Lovejoy

Mr A. C. G. Hayward (F) (Cass Hayward & Partners): The authors state that a design must take account of its erection or at least one possible sequence of construction. Unfortunately, the ‘accepted’ system in UK buildings, whereby the engineer designs only the members in a steel frame and requires the fabricator to proportion and detail the connections, is no encouragement, and problems occur. It has been known for fabricators to have been asked to design connections for a bending strength which exceeds that of the beams joined! Also the turnround demanded by ‘fasttrack’ construction means that a fabricator has insufficient time to design properly what are the most vital elements in the structure. Most structural failures or problems occur at connections.