The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 67 (1989) > Issues > Issue 3 > Academia. Response to Degree Courses in Civil and Structural Engineering by Professor M.R. Horne
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Academia. Response to Degree Courses in Civil and Structural Engineering by Professor M.R. Horne

As I read Professor Horne’s paper I too had a very strong feeling of deja vu but for an entirely different reason from that in the penultimate paragraph of the paper. I was educated through school and university in Glasgow and spent the first l1 years of my professional career there. I have spent the last 10 years in the Far East and in the Midlands of England where schooling and university entrance requirements have followed the A-level system. I have, therefore, been in a good position to compare the Scottish system of Highers combined with a 4-year university course and the English system of A levels combined with a 3-year university course. My conclusions, which are in no way nationalistic, are that the Scottish system provides a better balanced engineering education and seems to be similar to the ‘Access in engineering’ scheme referred to in Professor Horne’s paper. Robert McKittrick