The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 68 (1990) > Issues > Issue 23 > Promoting the Profession
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Promoting the Profession

The status in society of structural engineers is low compared to other professions. I will argue that, if we are to succeed in raising the status of our profession, we need to (a) make entrance to chartered status much more demanding, with the minimum academic requirements being a new-style 5-year honours degree and hence reduce the numbers of chartered engineers, while at the same time significantly developing the numbers of incorporated engineers in our profession; (b) create a clearer definition of what a structural engineer is by rationalising the bodies qualifying engineers involved in structural design. M.J. Murray