The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 7 (1929) > Issues > Issue 5 > Casing Piles, Damaged by Marine Worms, in Reinforced Concrete; and other Repairs at Swanage Pier
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Casing Piles, Damaged by Marine Worms, in Reinforced Concrete; and other Repairs at Swanage Pier

Swanage Bay is land-locked for an arc of 245 degs., extending between bearings, measured from a point approximately in the centre of the bay, of 47 degs. E of North to 28 degs. E of South, or, roughly, N.N.E. to S.S.E., and, within the limits of this arc, is surrounded by steep hills. From the same position in the centre of the bay the open sea thus subtends 115 degs. Swanage is protected from the full force of easterly winds by the Isle of Wight, distant some 25 miles due East, and is, therefore, only affected by winds blowing from a point or two South of East to East-South-East. It is consequently very well sheltered, and the air is mild, and the waters of the bay are generally at a higher temperature than that of the sea outside at any season. There is a double tide at. Swanage, which has a period of three hours between high waters. The maximum rise at springs is 6 ft. 6 in., and the average 6 ft. 1 in. Major F.M. Du-Plat-Taylor

Author(s): Du-Plat-Taylor, F M