The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 72 (1994) > Issues > Issue 7 > Correspondence on Structural Aspects of the Design and Construction of Quaestor House, City of Londo
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Correspondence on Structural Aspects of the Design and Construction of Quaestor House, City of London by Mr F.T. Hodgson

Mr M. K. Hurst (M) I was very interested to read of the application of post-tensioned slabs to a major building in the UK, never having really understood why the method has lacked popularity there. It is a routine form of construction in Australia, the USA, the Far East, and South Africa, where its economy has been recognised for many years. I have just completed the design of a building in Botswana, using slab post-tensioning technology from South Africa. In that building the slab was 200 mm thick with a column spacing of 6.3 m in each direction. This was a cheaper solution than the alternative in reinforced concrete.