The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 73 (1995) > Issues > Issue 14 > Discussion on Glass in Structural Engineering by Professor Dr Ing. G. Sedlacek, Dr K. Blank and Dipl
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Discussion on Glass in Structural Engineering by Professor Dr Ing. G. Sedlacek, Dr K. Blank and Dipl. Ing. J. Güsgen

Mr G. R. Hill (F) (Roland Hill Consulting Engineers) I should first like to congratulate Professor Sedlacek on a superb review of the theory behind structural glass, which is too little described and published. I think the cause of this lack of information - and this may be a little controversial - is the fault of the glass companies, who I think are too restrictive in the dissemination of the knowledge they have. I gave a paper in 1982 in a colloquium held here on ‘Glass as a structural material’. I thought it might be helpful to show some of the progress that has been made since then. Fig Dl shows the first squash court in the world with four, unobstructed, transparent walls, so that TV cameras and spectators could see through the walls. You may recognise the building in which this demountable squash court is erected - Brunel’s station in Bristol. This was designed when I was a Partner in Campbell Reith Hill.