The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 75 (1997) > Issues > Issue 3 > Discussion on The use of Fully Threaded Bolts for Connections in Structural Steelwork for Buildings
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Discussion on The use of Fully Threaded Bolts for Connections in Structural Steelwork for Buildings by Dr. G.W. Owens

Mr E. H. F. Taylor (F) (Ove Arup & Partners) How times change! This paper takes me back some 35 years to Trafford Park in Manchester and part of the structural steelwork industry. The most basic chore in that office was the scheduling of bolts for a job. We used to arm ourselves with full-sized sections of rolled steel joints and rolled steel channels showing the exact dimensions of bolts through the flanges, and then we would proceed: 3/4in diameter generally, 5/8in diameter for 4in flanges, 1/2in diameter for 3 1/2in flanges. It was, of course, sacrosanct that no part of the threaded portions occurred in the shear planes. Our economical length was 1/4in. On occasions we would end up by specifying a bolt, say, connecting a channel to a joist with perhaps up to two flat washers, an 8┬░ washer, a 5┬░washer, and a description showing the drawing, the stanchion number, the details of the connection, and so on.