The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 76 (1998) > Issues > Issue 19 > Windsor Castle: Fire Behaviour and Restoration Aspects of Historic Ironwork
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Windsor Castle: Fire Behaviour and Restoration Aspects of Historic Ironwork

The fire which consumed part of Windsor Castle in November 1992 provided a rare opportunity to observe the aftermath of a real fire in a building which incorporated structural metalwork dating back to the late 1820s. Much of the metalwork was of contemporary design and considered at that time to be ‘fireproof’. This paper discusses the origin of metalwork, its incorporation into the historic fabric, its performance under fire load, its collateral fabric damage, and its retention or replacement. Forensic techniques are described which gave the engineer an insight into the fire conditions experienced by the metalwork and how an assessment was made of components which were to be retained. New steelwork of current design is now incorporated in a way which draws upon an understanding of how metalwork behaves in historic masonry surroundings. D. Dibb-Fuller, R. Fewtrell and R. Swift