The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 76 (1998) > Issues > Issue 20 > Correspondence on Material and Geometric Properties of Structural Steel for Use in Design by Dr. M.P
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Correspondence on Material and Geometric Properties of Structural Steel for Use in Design by Dr. M.P. Byfield and Professor D.A. Nethercot

Mr P. Maranian (Brandow & Johnson Associates, California, USA): I have five comments on the excellent paper by Byfield & Nethercot. ( 1 ) From how many mills were samples taken? Did this represent most of the major producers in Europe? (2) Did any samples come from mills outside of Europe (e.g. South America, Japan, USA)? (3) The paper mentions that webs have much higher yield stress than the flanges. There has also been some concern recently in the USA that along with the higher yield stress in the web, very low toughness has been found in the ‘K’ area (junction between flange and web). This has typically occurred in rolled sections but is somewhat alleviated when gag straightened methods are used. Were any studies carried out on toughness characteristics of steel? (4) Were any studies carried out to determine variation due to mill processes, i.e. semi-killed, killed, silicon, continuous casting, etc? (5) A few engineers on the west coast of the USA have been somewhat concerned regarding the distribution of non-metallic inclusions (e.g. sulphides, silicates) and their detrimental effect on the performance of welds. Have there been any recent studies carried out on this aspect?