The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 77 (1999) > Issues > Issue 20 > Discussion on Demolition of Marks and Spencer, Manchester by Dr J.M. Roberts
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Discussion on Demolition of Marks and Spencer, Manchester by Dr J.M. Roberts

Mr P. L. Campbell (Past President) In 1973, not long after the M & S structure was constructed, I was asked by the editor of New Scientist to write an article about the inherent dangers of demolishing ‘special’ structures (pre- and post-tensioned structures, nuclear and offshore installations, etc.), if full information concerning the original design were not available. I believe that such structures should have a plaque stating that they are ‘special’, and full design information should be retained in a central repository in perpetuity for reference by future generations. On the face of it this building had well-grouted tendons, space around it, a useful basement area, and a configuration that suggests to me that demolition using explosives was an obvious option. Was this considered and, if so, why was it rejected?