The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 77 (1999) > Issues > Issue 23/24 > Discussion on A Simple, Consistent Approach to Structural Concrete
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Discussion on A Simple, Consistent Approach to Structural Concrete

Dr S. B. Desai (F) (Department of the Environment, Transport & the Regions) You state, under eqn (8) of the paper, that the core will remain uncracked if the principal shear stress voldV does not exceed fct/3, where fct is the concrete tensile strength given by fct= 0.3(f'c)2/3. This implies that the shear strength is related to (fc)2/3. Although this relationship may agree with that given in EC 2, it tends to give unsafe results for higher values off,. BS 8110 relates concrete shear strength to the cube root of compressive strength, which is more realistic.