The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 78 (2000) > Issues > Issue 15 > Replacement of Decayed Beam Ends with Epoxy-Bonded Timber Composites: Structural Testing
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Replacement of Decayed Beam Ends with Epoxy-Bonded Timber Composites: Structural Testing

Rotted beam-joist ends occur in timber members in old and not-so-old buildings. Reinstatement can take many forms. In the case of relatively small joists in both domestic and commercial properties, the normal method is to remove the floorboards and then remove all of the offending joists. This is usually true even if a joist is 4.0m long and the decay has occurred only in the proximity of an external wall. A flitched beam approach can also be used in which steel plates or channels are bolted to each side of the existing joist, often encapsulating the decayed region. However, if the beam or joist is in a position where it is visible, this can be unsightly and aesthetically unacceptable. R. Jones and D. Smedley

Author(s): Jones, R;Smedley, D

Keywords: timber;repairing;beams;strengthening;load tests;epoxy resins;sheer;deflecting