The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 78 (2000) > Issues > Issue 2 > Strengthening an Existing Berth From 8900 DWT to 35 000 DWT
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Strengthening an Existing Berth From 8900 DWT to 35 000 DWT

Jurong Port, one of the region’s leading industrial deep-water ports, is Singapore’s main gateway for bulk and industrial cargo. The port has 23 berths, totalling 4.4km of berth length, and handles about 14Mt of cargo each year. In 1997, 7200 vessels called at the port. An overall view of the port’s berth layout is shown in Fig 1. C.S. Ong, W.Y. Mao and S.T. Wong

Author(s): Ong, G S;Mao, W Y;Wong, S T

Keywords: ports;piers;berths;piles;design;analysis;precast concrete;Jurong Port;singapore;lateral loads;strengthening