The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 78 (2000) > Issues > Issue 7 > Correspondence on Vulnerability of Buildings in Malta to Earthquake, Volcano and Tsunami Hazard by D
Name of File 6476-78-07.pdf cached at 15/12/2017 23:50:18 - with 2 pages. pdfPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\47\47187ca4-450b-465c-a68e-a477b9548b99.pdf. thumbPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\pdfthumbs\47187ca4-450b-465c-a68e-a477b9548b99_1.png. objDoc: 1 - True. objPreview.Log: . strFileName: 47187ca4-450b-465c-a68e-a477b9548b99_1.png

Members/subscribers must be logged in to view this article

Correspondence on Vulnerability of Buildings in Malta to Earthquake, Volcano and Tsunami Hazard by D.H. Camilleri

Mr A. Cauchi (M) It is well-known that the earthquake of 1693 had a devastating effect on buildings all over Sicily , as well as in Malta. However, I wish to state that many buildings survived that earthquake in Malta and these were also built in stone. The probable reason is that some buildings were better built than others: e. g. the Norman Cathedral of Mdina, probably built around AD 1200, was totally demolished, only its wooden doors surviving, while the Birgu Norman Tower (about 35m high x about 5m at its base and also built around AD 1200 or before) survived all earthquakes and was to be demolished by bombs only in World War 2. Castle Sant Angelo (one of the oldest buildings in Malta) also survived them all and still stands today.