The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 80 (2002) > Issues > Issue 2 > Eco- and adventure tourism facilities and the bungy jumping phenomenon
Name of File 483-80-2.pdf cached at 18/12/2017 09:17:26 - with 4 pages. pdfPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\4c\4c6cfaa9-6986-4c57-a2ac-dbe40dc64dc8.pdf. thumbPath: E:\k9.istructe.org\CMS\webtest\files\pdfthumbs\4c6cfaa9-6986-4c57-a2ac-dbe40dc64dc8_1.png. objDoc: 1 - True. objPreview.Log: Font 'StoneSans-Semibold' was replaced by 'Helvetica-Bold'. Font 'StoneSans-Bold' was replaced by 'Helvetica-Bold'. Font 'StoneSans' was replaced by 'Helvetica'. . strFileName: 4c6cfaa9-6986-4c57-a2ac-dbe40dc64dc8_1.png

Members/subscribers must be logged in to view this article

Eco- and adventure tourism facilities and the bungy jumping phenomenon

Tourism can be a passive or active adventure. The author has been involved in two underwater facilities, which could be described as passive, and highly active bungy jumping facilities. The first eco-structure is a floating reception area and viewing room located in Milford Sound, New Zealand. This room allows 60–70 people to view the unique marine life at a depth of 10–11m under the sea. The second eco-facility is a submarine service barge located in Milford Sound. The submarine to be serviced is small but capable of diving to 300m with four passengers. The bungy jumping phenomenon requires structures designed to take into account the paramount requirement of safety. Speeds of 134 km/h are achieved during a jump and the effect on the body and mind during a jump is described. A. E. Tyndall, BE, FIPENZ, Registered Engineer, Member of the Association of Consulting Engineers New Zealand Tyndall and Hanham Consulting Engineers, Christchurch, New Zealand