The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 85 (2007) > Issues > Issue 8 > Experimental dynamic analysis of the Kingston Communications Stadium
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Experimental dynamic analysis of the Kingston Communications Stadium

This paper presents the methodology of and results from the dynamic testing of the new Kingston Communications Stadium in Hull. Modal testing was carried out using two different methods. Firstly, shaker modal testing based on frequency response function measurements was carried out to determine vertical modes of vibration of the seating decks. This is the most accurate technology available when artificial excitation can be supplied, controlled and measured. Secondly, ambient vibration testing was carried out to estimate global fore-and-aft and side-to-side modes of vibration, which could not be excited sufficiently using artificial shaker excitation. The shaker modal testing and ambient testing technologies are shown to determine successfully a number of modes of vibration both for vertical seating deck modes and horizontal fore-and-aft and side-to-side global modes. Modes of vibration in general had natural frequencies in line with those expected from the analysis carried out during design, although the general trend was for measured natural frequencies to be slightly higher. This was probably a result of increased stiffness and mass of the actual structure due to the presence of non-structural elements and other elements such as vomitory walls that were not included in the analysis. It was also found that the modes of vibration of the seating decks tended to be quite localised. This was probably a result of the presence of very stiff vomitory walls that had the effect of breaking up the modes of vibration that might otherwise have engaged the full length of the stands. Paul Reynolds, MEng, PhD Senior Lecturer, The University of Sheffield, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Aleksandar Pavic, BSc, MSc, PhD, CEng, MIStructE Professor of Vibration Engineering and EPSRC Advanced Research Fellow, The University of Sheffield, Department of Civil and Structural Engineering Jonathan Carr, BEng, MPhil, CEng, MIStructE Associate, SKM Anthony Hunts, Sheffield

Author(s): Reynolds, Paul;Pavic, Aleksandar;Carr, Jonathan

Keywords: kingston communications stadium, hull;stadia;dynamic loads;vibration;testing;seating