The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 86 (2008) > Issues > Issue 14 > Bridges: spanning art and technology - Ian P. T. Firth and Poul Ove Jensen
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Bridges: spanning art and technology - Ian P. T. Firth and Poul Ove Jensen

Bridges have for centuries been seen as symbols of man's civilising influence on the planet. A study of bridges throughout history reveals some key characteristics of the civilisations which created them. Think for example of the massive masonry blocks of the Pont du Gard in Roman France, or the pedestrian suspension bridges made from natural ropes in the high Himalaya. These reveal something about the nature of the society which built them.