The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 86 (2008) > Issues > Issue 14 > Conservation, refurbishment and re-use of buildings - Robert P. Bowles and Robert Thorne
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Conservation, refurbishment and re-use of buildings - Robert P. Bowles and Robert Thorne

Contrary to accepted belief, building conservation is not governed by rigid dogmas. It is prevented from being so because buildings are so varied in their history, quality, structural form and use. One rule cannot fit all; instead each building presents a particular set of problems, from the initial decision whether it should be retained or demolished to the question of what remedies should be applied; whether it should be conserved as found, or repaired, or in part replaced. Every case has both a philosophical and practical dimension.