The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 9 (1921) > Issues > Issue 1 > The Charterhouse Street cold stores of the Port of London Authority
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The Charterhouse Street cold stores of the Port of London Authority

The scope of this paper does not permit the inclusion of a review of the growth of business in frozen or chilled produce as facilities in carriage and cold storage developed, nor yet an exposition of the advantages of cold storage in enabling perishable produce to be transported from great distances and through tropical temperatures, whilst at the same time preserving it in a condition for distribution to and consumption by the public. But a few brief words on the subject of cold storage in the Port during the early days may not be amiss as introductory to the principal subject of the paper. H. J. Deane