Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 16): Standard tied independent scaffolds

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Date published

1 May 2013

Price

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Members/Subscribers: Free

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Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 16): Standard tied independent scaffolds

The Structural Engineer
Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 16): Standard tied independent scaffolds
Date published

1 May 2013

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

This article focuses on the design and inspection of scaffolds. Based on UK practice and experience, the principles should be universally applicable.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Managing Health & Safety Risks Professional Guidance Issue 5

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