Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 6): Designing a laterally loaded masonry wall

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers

Date published

1 June 2013

Price

Standard: £9
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Back to Previous

Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 6): Designing a laterally loaded masonry wall

The Structural Engineer
Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 6): Designing a laterally loaded masonry wall
Date published

1 June 2013

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers

Price

Standard: £9
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers

Until relatively recently, masonry was the major load bearing component in a building structure. With the advent of steel and concrete frame technologies, masonry has become a part of a building’s cladding envelope and as such is more prone to being exposed to lateral loads than vertical ones.


This Technical Guidance Note concerns the design of masonry walls that are subject to lateral loads i.e. they are being used as a cladding element. It will discuss the way in which the material is assessed against how it is
being restrained and its geometry. All of these factors have an impact on the design of masonry walls as well as the mortar within them and the exposure conditions. This is discussed in Technical Guidance Note 27 (Level 1) and should be read in conjunction with this guide.



(This article was updated in October 2016 to reflect errata issued since its original publication.)

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Technical Guidance Notes Technical Guidance Notes (Level 2) Technical Guidance Notes Technical Issue 6

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
<h4>Technical Guidance Note (Level 1, No. 27): Introduction to masonry</h4>

Technical Guidance Note (Level 1, No. 27): Introduction to masonry

The use of masonry dates back to antiquity with evidence of the use of some form of stone masonry originating over 10,000 years ago. This guide introduces the material, focusing on the two most common forms; brick and concrete block.

Date - 1 June 2013
Author - The Institution of Structural Engineers
Price - £0/£9
The Structural Engineer
<h4>Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 21): Design and detailing of base plates to steel columns</h4>

Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 21): Design and detailing of base plates to steel columns

This Technical Guidance Note describes the design and detailing of base plates – the primary means by which steel-framed structures transmit vertical loads into their foundations.

Date - 1 May 2019
Author - C. O'Regan (AECOM)
Price - £0/£9
The Structural Engineer
<h4>Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 9): Designing a reinforced concrete retaining wall</h4>

Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 9): Designing a reinforced concrete retaining wall

Although retaining walls have been the subject of two earlier Technical Guidance Notes; No. 8 (Level 1): Derivation of loading to retaining structures and No. 33 (Level 1): Retaining wall construction, their design has not been covered. This guidance note focuses specifically on the design of reinforced concrete gravity retaining walls. There are three different forms of this type of wall, all of which are designed to resist overturning and sliding failure. The primary difference between them is their height. The taller the retaining wall, the more likely that counterforts and beams spanning between them will be necessary. This note describes how all of these forms of retaining wall can be designed. (This article was updated in October 2016 to reflect errata issued since its original publication.)

Date - 1 January 2014
Author - The Institution of Structural Engineers
Price - £0/£9