The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 91 (2013) > Issues > Issue 2 > Potential benefits of incorporating active vibration control in floor structures
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Potential benefits of incorporating active vibration control in floor structures

The design and usage of pedestrian structures has changed substantially in recent years, leading to an increase in problematic post-construction vibrations due to in-service loading. One alternative technology that could be used to help mitigate this problem, particularly in floor structures, is active vibration control (AVC). While relatively mature for the full-structure control of seismic- and wind-induced vibrations, its application to floor structures is in still its infancy. This paper uses field trials and a small number of implementations to illustrate the significant potential for the technology in this area.

Author(s): M. Hudson (University of Sheffield) P. Reynolds (University of Sheffield)