Conservation compendium. Part 11: A career in ruins (the challenges presented by derelict structures

Author: J. Avent (Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers)

Date published

1st October 2015

First published: 1st October 2015

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Conservation compendium. Part 11: A career in ruins (the challenges presented by derelict structures

The Structural Engineer
Conservation compendium. Part 11: A career in ruins (the challenges presented by derelict structures
Date published

1st October 2015

First published

1st October 2015

Author

J. Avent (Conservation Accreditation Register for Engineers)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Our built heritage is a finite resource stretching back thousands of years. Protecting and conserving this heritage is a challenge requiring knowledge, skills and experience, together with an ability to bring practical engineering judgement and often creative and imaginative solutions. This paper sets out the challenges faced by engineers and some of the approaches taken in the appraisal and protection of ruins.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
5
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 10

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