Conservation compendium. Part 4: Assessment and replacement of stone

Author: E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Date published

27 February 2015

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Conservation compendium. Part 4: Assessment and replacement of stone

The Structural Engineer
Author

E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Date published

27 February 2015

Author

E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Replacement of stone on historic buildings may be required for numerous reasons.
These include age-related decay and weathering, poor workmanship in terms of material choice or setting, defective fixings, and structural failure. The main aim, in assessment, will be to retain the historic fabric where practical.
However, the decision to replace will depend to a great extent on having a clear understanding of the significance of the stone, both individually and within the context of the element that it is part of, its predicted life or durability and its cost.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 3

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