Conservation compendium. Part 4: Assessment and replacement of stone

Author: E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Date published

27 February 2015

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Back to Previous

Conservation compendium. Part 4: Assessment and replacement of stone

The Structural Engineer
Conservation compendium. Part 4: Assessment and replacement of stone
Date published

27 February 2015

Author

E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Author

E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Replacement of stone on historic buildings may be required for numerous reasons.
These include age-related decay and weathering, poor workmanship in terms of material choice or setting, defective fixings, and structural failure. The main aim, in assessment, will be to retain the historic fabric where practical.
However, the decision to replace will depend to a great extent on having a clear understanding of the significance of the stone, both individually and within the context of the element that it is part of, its predicted life or durability and its cost.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 3

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
<h4>Concrete Design Guide. No. 3: Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures for lateral loads and other f</h4>

Concrete Design Guide. No. 3: Eurocode 6: Design of masonry structures for lateral loads and other f

The design for horizontal actions, fire and materials is considered, along with simplified methods of design. Throughout this article the Nationally Determined Parameters (NDPs) from the UK National Annexes have been used. These enable Eurocode 6 (BS EN 1996-1-1) to be applied in the UK.

Date ‐ 27 February 2015
Author ‐ The Concrete Centre
Price ‐ £9
The Structural Engineer
<h4>Conservation compendium. Part 13: Common repairs and strengthening of structural timbers in historic</h4>

Conservation compendium. Part 13: Common repairs and strengthening of structural timbers in historic

Timber and stone are the oldest known building materials. Our most ancient buildings are characterised by their use. So it is no surprise that an engineer looking after historic fabric will regularly encounter the need to repair timberwork. The greatest threats to the structural integrity of timber are from attack by rot and insect; therefore, in the damp British Isles, those working in conservation will often need to reach for the sketchpad to record and re-detail areas damaged by the effects of moisture. Interventions to historic timberwork are also necessary when a building is converted. This happens, for example, when floor joists are reframed or loading is assessed for a new use. While philosophically this is different to a simple repair, it nevertheless requires similar skillsets to achieve the best, most sensitive results. This article looks briefly at these matters, first from the aspect of conservation philosophy and material choice to establish some ground rules, and then by showing some of the details typically in use in the UK today. In order to focus on these, it does not consider survey and diagnosis.

Date ‐ 1 December 2015
Author ‐ J. Miller (Ramboll)
Price ‐ £9
The Structural Engineer
<h4>Conservation compendium. Part 8: Bond timbers in old brickwork</h4>

Conservation compendium. Part 8: Bond timbers in old brickwork

This article focuses on the phenomenon of 'bond timbers', which were commonly built into masonry walls from the late 17th to the early 19th century. Guidance is offered to engineers who may encounter these when working on an existing building.

Date ‐ 1 July 2015
Author ‐ L. Hurst and A. Dutton (Consultants, Hurst Peirce + Malcolm LLP)
Price ‐ £9