Conservation compendium. Part 7: Imposed load in historic buildings: assessing what is real

Author: I. Hume (formerly English Heritage) and J. Miller (Ramboll)

Date published

1 June 2015

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Conservation compendium. Part 7: Imposed load in historic buildings: assessing what is real

The Structural Engineer
Author

I. Hume (formerly English Heritage) and J. Miller (Ramboll)

Date published

1 June 2015

Author

I. Hume (formerly English Heritage) and J. Miller (Ramboll)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This article looks at some aspects of floor loading and how its application has changed for the better. It encourages a careful consideration of loadings to avoid unnecessary and irreversible loss of fabric through the application of significant strengthening schemes, cutting away existing historic framing.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
4
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 6

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