Conservation compendium. Part 9: Corrosion of steel frames behind masonry elevations – an introducti

Author: Eur Ing M. D. Beare (CARE, AKS Ward-Lister Beare Consulting Engineers)

Date published

31 July 2015

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Conservation compendium. Part 9: Corrosion of steel frames behind masonry elevations – an introducti

Conservation compendium. Part 9: Corrosion of steel frames behind masonry elevations – an introducti
The Structural Engineer
Author

Eur Ing M. D. Beare (CARE, AKS Ward-Lister Beare Consulting Engineers)

Date published

31 July 2015

Author

Eur Ing M. D. Beare (CARE, AKS Ward-Lister Beare Consulting Engineers)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This article is the first of two which will discuss the problem of corrosion of steel
frames behind masonry elevations. It aims to provide an introduction to this form of
construction and to consider the ways in which lack of maintenance can lead to corrosion of the steel frame, before setting out how remedial work should be
approached.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 8

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