Conservation compendium. Part 10: Corrosion of steel frames behind masonry elevations – assessment a

Author: M.D. Beare (AKS Ward-Lister Beare Consulting Engineers)

Date published

1 September 2015

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Conservation compendium. Part 10: Corrosion of steel frames behind masonry elevations – assessment a

The Structural Engineer
Conservation compendium. Part 10: Corrosion of steel frames behind masonry elevations – assessment a
Date published

1 September 2015

Author

M.D. Beare (AKS Ward-Lister Beare Consulting Engineers)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

M.D. Beare (AKS Ward-Lister Beare Consulting Engineers)

This article continues from the previous instalment in the series, and aims to guide engineers in assessing the extent of corrosion of steel frames and in selecting appropriate treatment methods.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 9

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