Conservation compendium. Part 15: Use of lime in historic masonry construction in the UK and Ireland

Author: T. Ryan

Date published

1st February 2016

First published: 1st February 2016

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Conservation compendium. Part 15: Use of lime in historic masonry construction in the UK and Ireland

The Structural Engineer
Conservation compendium. Part 15: Use of lime in historic masonry construction in the UK and Ireland
Date published

1st February 2016

First published

1st February 2016

Author

T. Ryan

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

In conservation work and like-for-like repair on older masonry, lime mortar is the only recommended material. The thick, plain or lightly punctured walls that make up most historic buildings have few concentrations of load. Calculations of stress in such cases are often needless and, subject perhaps to the check of any critical element, we can generally lay aside our concerns about mortar strength.

In contrast, the need to maintain a balance of moisture and flexibility in the body of an old wall is essential. Ignoring this will lead to the classic error of repointing old structures in brittle, impermeable Portland cement (OPC) mortar. The mortar provides the route for evaporation from the core and should be more permeable than the brick or stone. To reverse this by sealing the joints with a hard finish can only lead to trouble.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
4
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Conservation compendium Technical Issue 2

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