Viewpoint: Digital design, fabrication and assembly

Author: T. Lucas (Price & Myers)

Date published

1 March 2016

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Viewpoint: Digital design, fabrication and assembly

The Structural Engineer
Viewpoint: Digital design, fabrication and assembly
Date published

1 March 2016

Author

T. Lucas (Price & Myers)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Author

T. Lucas (Price & Myers)

Tim Lucas of Price & Myers envisages a not-too-distant future in which automation is extended to assembly on site, giving engineers full control of the building process and licence to explore their wildest design dreams.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
2
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Opinion Issue 3

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