The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 94 (2016) > Issue 4 > Conservation compendium. Part 16: The monitoring of movement in historic buildings and structures
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Conservation compendium. Part 16: The monitoring of movement in historic buildings and structures

Historic buildings and structures, like any other, move to some degree, whether due to thermal effects, changes in moisture levels in the structural fabric, influences on the founding subsoil, or environmental forces. The key question for the conservation engineer is to determine whether the movement is progressive and presents a risk to the structure.

This article introduces engineers to the various techniques available to monitor movement in historic structures, from simple manual techniques which are less commonly used today, to sophisticated electronic systems. The form of monitoring will depend on the nature of the assumed movement, the funds available, and the possible consequences if the movement is progressive.

Author(s): E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)