Conservation compendium. Part 16: The monitoring of movement in historic buildings and structures

Author: E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Date published

1 April 2016

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Conservation compendium. Part 16: The monitoring of movement in historic buildings and structures

The Structural Engineer
Conservation compendium. Part 16: The monitoring of movement in historic buildings and structures
Date published

1 April 2016

Author

E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Author

E. Morton (The Morton Partnership Ltd)

Historic buildings and structures, like any other, move to some degree, whether due to thermal effects, changes in moisture levels in the structural fabric, influences on the founding subsoil, or environmental
forces. The key question for the conservation engineer is to determine whether the movement is progressive
and presents a risk to the structure.


This article introduces engineers to the various techniques available to monitor movement in historic structures, from simple manual techniques which are less commonly used today, to sophisticated electronic systems. The form of monitoring will depend on the nature of the assumed movement, the funds available, and the possible consequences if the movement is progressive.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
4
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 4

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