Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 49): Slips, trips and falls

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Date published

1 April 2016

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 49): Slips, trips and falls

The Structural Engineer
Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 49): Slips, trips and falls
Date published

1 April 2016

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Everyday slips, trips and falls are one of the commonest sources of injury in the home, in the street and on construction sites. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) reports that several thousand workers are injured in this way in the UK every year, with injuries ranging from bruises, through broken limbs to the more serious. Day-to-day good housekeeping on construction sites should ensure that slip or trip hazards are minimised.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Managing Health & Safety Risks Issue 4

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