Conservation compendium. Part 17: Filler-joist floors – development, capacity and typical defects

Author: J. Miller (CTP Consulting Engineers)

Date published

1 May 2016

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Conservation compendium. Part 17: Filler-joist floors – development, capacity and typical defects

The Structural Engineer
Author

J. Miller (CTP Consulting Engineers)

Date published

1 May 2016

Author

J. Miller (CTP Consulting Engineers)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

According to the Institution’s librarians, one of the most common requests they receive is for information on structural floor systems dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In particular, engineers appear to have a thirst to know more about filler-joist floors. This article describes their origin and how they perform.


The term “filler joist” is a generic one used for certain types of building floors dating in particular from the late Victorian era to World War II. These may commonly have embedded iron or steel joists. Those of earlier date, from the 19th century, can have wrought iron sections, or even cast iron tees in early floors. They span one way between beams or bearings, and are encased in concrete made with coke-breeze, clinker, broken brick or conventional aggregates.


The filler-joist floor was – at the time – a very important structural development, now long superseded by other systems, such as flat slabs and composite decks. It grew out of an enthusiastic age of Victorian invention that had created a wide range of proprietary, patented make-ups that all worked in a roughly similar way. Filler joists are encountered frequently in the alteration and remodelling of large office and institutional buildings.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
4
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 5

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